ATTENTION ALL ROS1+ CANCER PATIENTS! Canadian ROS1 patients need our help ASAP!


Lung Cancer Canada is collecting data to support approval of crizotinib for ROS1+ non-small cell lung cancer in their country. Their deadline for submission is rapidly approaching, and they need more data to strengthen their case. They would like ROS1+ patients who have taking crizotinib to share the following information (no names): Demographic data (e.g., … Continue reading ATTENTION ALL ROS1+ CANCER PATIENTS! Canadian ROS1 patients need our help ASAP!

Presentations on ROS1+ Cancer at IASLC #WCLC2018


Members of The ROS1ders will be attending The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer’s (IASLC) annual World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) in Toronto, Canada, September 23-26, 2018.  The Twitter hashtag for the conference is #WCLC2018. Presentations that will mention ROS1+ cancer are listed below.  The abstract book containing these and other WCLC … Continue reading Presentations on ROS1+ Cancer at IASLC #WCLC2018

The value of oncogene-focused patient-caregiver groups


Thanks to Dr. H. Jack West for the shout-out to our ros1cancer.com website and our page Drugs to Treat ROS1+ Cancer! Time to highlight that we are now in an era when pts w/rare cancers are increasingly likely to know more than docs, even very good ones, about their dzs. This @ros1cancer page on Drugs … Continue reading The value of oncogene-focused patient-caregiver groups

The Unnecessary Cruelty of Clinical Trials by: Lisa Goldman


Since I’ve been holding steady on my treatment, I haven’t needed access to a clinical trial yet. However, clinical trials may become essential to my survival, and I’m already concerned about getting into them when I need help the most. I often hear scientists ask, “how can we increase patient participation in clinical trials so … Continue reading The Unnecessary Cruelty of Clinical Trials by: Lisa Goldman

Should we combine TKIs and immunotherapy?


Some researchers think combining immunotherapy and certain targeted therapies called tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) may be too toxic for patients. This Phase 1/2 study supports that idea. It combined nivolumab and full-dose crizotinib in ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer, and was discontinued for safety reasons when 38% of the first 13 patients developed liver problems … Continue reading Should we combine TKIs and immunotherapy?